Mason-Rice EcoFest

Mason-Rice EcoFest. Friday, May 1 from 5-7 p.m.

Looking for ways to reduce your carbon footprint? Want to make sense of those tricky recycling rules? Curious about composting?  The EcoFest will be full of interactive and informative experiences designed to give your family ideas for how to follow a greener lifestyle.

Mason-Rice Green Team

Food Waste Diversion Program at Mason-Rice

Original post from the Green Cart Chronicle  – 

April 9, 2020

In February, Mason-Rice Elementary School launched a food waste diversion program in its cafeteria. Mason-Rice is the third school to incorporate food waste diversion, joining Angier and Zervas where similar programs started last year. Special thanks to Mason-Rice Principal Jake Bultema and several parents, including Heather Friedman and Wendy Sheu for bringing this composting program to life. The food waste will be picked up at Mason-Rice twice weekly by Black Earth Compost. Check out the video that the Mason-Rice Green Team made that explains how this new waste stream functions in the school cafeteria. School recycling and food waste diversion programs are being coordinated by Newton DPW on a voluntary basis. Interested in knowing more? Contact Erica with Newton DPW at [email protected]

Food waste makes up 26% of the weight of trash collected in Massachusetts. That not only fills landfills, but also costs us a lot of money in waste disposal fees. Instead of throwing food waste in the trash, composting turns leftover food back into a soil amendment to grow more food.

Click on the image to watch the video:

Mason-Rice Lunchtime Compost Guide

Composting at Mason-Rice

Original post from the Mayor’s Update – 
 
By Mayor Ruthanne Fuller,  Feb 28, 2020
 
Mason-Rice Elementary School this week launched a food waste composting program in its cafeteria. Mason-Rice is the third school with composting, joining Angier and Zervas where similar programs started last year.
 
Special thanks to Mason-Rice Principal Jake Bultema and several parents, including Heather Friedman and Wendy Sheu, and our Newton Department of Public Works for bringing composting to another school.
 
The food waste will be picked up at Mason-Rice twice weekly by Black Earth Compost. School recycling and food waste diversion programs are being coordinated by Newton DPW on a voluntary basis. Interested in knowing more? Contact Erica with Newton DPW at [email protected]
 
Leftover food and food waste thrown in the garbage make up 26 percent of the weight of trash collected in Massachusetts. That not only fills landfills, it costs us a lot of money in waste disposal fees. Instead of throwing food waste in the trash, composting turns leftover food back into soil to grow more food.
 
Interested in composting at your own home? You can purchase a bin for your backyard through the City for $25 here.
 
You can also sign up with Black Earth Composting for curbside food waste collection. Black Earth Compost, the City-vetted company residents can sign with for curbside collection, costs Newtonians $59.99 for six months, plus a one-time start-up fee of $34 to pay for a 13-gallon lockable bin. Black Earth Compost will collect your food waste once a week at the curb on the same collection day as your trash/recycling. Get more information about composting and Black Earth Compost at blackearthcompost.com.​
 
Stay tuned for more news on bringing your food waste for composting at the City of Newton Resource Recovery Center on Rumford Avenue. We expect this program to be up and running in the next few months.

Newton Schools were honored for their environmental efforts during the 2018-2019 school year

Three Newton schools were awarded with the 25th Annual Secretary’s Awards for Excellence in Energy and Environmental Education.

  • Mason-Rice Elementary School – “Green Team Kids,” Grades, 3, 4 & 5
  • Bowen Elementary School – “Newton Environmental Science Program,” Newton Conservation Commission, David Backer, Executive Director – Grades 5-8
  • Mt. Alvernia Academy (Chestnut Hill) – “STEM FUN FAIR,” Grades K-5

Winners competed for $5,000 in awards, funded by the Massachusetts Environmental Trust with the intention to fund further environmental education initiatives at the schools. EEA solicited Excellence in Energy and Environmental Education Award nominations in early 2019. Schools and organizations that voluntarily incorporate environmental education into public or private school curricula are given priority. Read more…