Climate Education Survey 2020 – first results

In an effort to promote more Climate Education in Newton schools, earlier this year we created a survey for teachers. We wanted  to find out what is already being taught in the district and what can be done to strengthen climate literacy and justice for our students. 

The survey was launched in March and due to Covid-19 and the closures of schools we didn’t promote it as much as we had originally planned. We hope to build on this effort once school commences in the Fall. For now, these are the initial results.

Given that many survey respondents expressed interest in training focused on climate education, we compiled a list of low-cost, flexible summer professional development options.

If you have not taken the survey yet, please take it here: CLIMATE EDUCATION SURVEY 

 

Climate Education Survey 2020

Survey data from 03/09/2020 to 04/03/2020
Number of respondents: 84

We found a few patterns in the answers:

  • Climate Change is not part of the curriculum and it’s hard to find time/resources to incorporate the topic and space/time to teach it.
  • Many are interested in learning more but lack time, knowledge, resources, ideas for activities, projects, etc.
  • Some teachers bring up the topic in passing or in a few lessons, ranging from statistics and environmental poetry to music and the Industrial Revolution.
  • It never occurred to teach it.

Sample comments:

  • Interested in ways to support the staff and facilitate trainings.
  • It is difficult to fit in anything more to the required curriculum.
  • I try to practice energy conservation and recycling habits with students in the classroom – concrete steps they can understand to contribute to efforts against climate change.
  • Climate change is a politically charged topic.
  • Kids are already cynical about being preached at.
  • Indirectly it is taught in terms of how we treat the environment, our spaces.
  • It doesn’t often apply unless a given project connects to it.  
  • I have not made it a priority to incorporate climate change into my lessons (though I am interested in finding ways to do this).
  • This topic is dear to me.
  • It’s a topic on many kids’ minds.  
  • Students bring it up for discussion depending on what is in the curriculum.
  • It relates to health of our people; health of our planet.
  • I don’t have a lot of knowledge on how to teach the topic, the current curriculums are pretty packed as it is.